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The best solitaire strategy tips and tactics for winning at: beleaguered castle, busy aces, canfield, carpet, deuces, forty thieves, frog, gold, klondike, pyramid, spider.

 

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Beleaguered Castle
Busy Aces
Calculation
Canfield- Demon
Carpet
Chessboard
Deuces
Forty Thieves
Four Seasons
Frog

Gaps
Golf
Klondike
Monte Carlo
Pyramid
St. Helena
Scorpion
Sly Fox
Yukon

 

Beleaguered Castle

Chances of success are 1 in 3 games.
Games: All 52 cards are dealt face up; the aces are placed in a separate column. The object of the game is to build up each ace in sequence and in suit to kings.The exposed or outer card of each row is available for building or for packing on the exposed card of another row in descending sequence regardless of suit. Only one card can be moved at a time. A vacancy made by clearing out an entire row may be filled with any available card.
Hints

Do not move a card until you have planned a complete line of play that will create a space.
Do not build on foundations merely because you can. Building on some may block later plays, higher cards played here may be indispensable for tableau building to release lower cards wanted. Ideally keep all four foundations abreast.
Play two or three to a foundation, but then building only on foundations when you can keep them abreast, or when necessary to release buried cards.

 

Busy Aces

Chance of wining 9 out of 10
A two deck game with lots to keep you busy, as the name implies.
Cards are played in sequence and in suit on those aces, from ace to king. Below the aces are 2 rows of six cards each; you can play those cards on the aces in sequence and suit, and you can also build on those cards downward in suit, from king to two. Turn cards over from the deck one at a time; the top card from the deck is playable as is the top card on the wastepile.  So you are simultaneously building up in sequence and in suit (on the aces) and down in sequence and in suit (on the two rows of six). Spaces created on the two rows of six are filled in from the deck or the wastepile. There is no redeal. Any time an ace comes up, it is placed in the top row.

 

Calculation

Win 1 in 5 games
Suites are built up in four different intervals.
Objective: To build four suites in a row based on the foundation card. Each card on the foundation card is to be twice that of the base card and each suite is to be built upwards to the king, regardless of suite, by the internal prescribed by the foundation card .
For more information click here

 

Canfield- Demon

Chance of winning 1 in 30.
There are two stacks of cards to choose from, thirteen cards that are dealt face-up at the beginning of the game to form the stockpile, and the deck. Next to the stockpile is a row of 4 face-up cards, and above that row is a single card. The object of the game is to build up in sequence and in suit on that single card. As other cards of the same rank as the single card become available place them in the available empty space. If the single card was a nine of heart, as nines in other suits are available place them next in the spaces next to the single card. This row can only be built up in sequences and in suit.

You can play the cards in the row of 4, the top card in the stockpile, and the top card dealt from the deck (cards from the deck will be dealt in threes, like in traditional solitaire). The row of four cards can be built down in sequence, alternating colors (red 6 on a black 7). As you build and get piles, you can move an entire pile as a unit to another column, or a single card, in the row of 4. Any time you create a space in the row of 4, that space will be automatically filled from the stockpile; once the stockpile is empty, the spaces can be filled from the top of the wastepile. Note Kings follow Aces in row of 4. Click on circle, then click on deck to redeal. Continue redealing until game either blocks or comes out.

Carpet
Chance of winning 3 out of 4
All four aces are exposed, and the object of the game is to build up on the aces in sequence and in suit to king.
In between the aces lies a carpet of twenty cards. All of the carpet cards are available for play on the aces. When you can't play any more carpet cards, turn over one card at a time from the deck. Play the card if you can or add it to the wastepile or use it to fill in spaces in the carpet. There's no re-deal in carpet; you only go around once so make the most of it!

 

Chessboard
Chance of winning 1 in 5 games
This game is a modification of Beleaguered Castle.The entire deck is dealt face up into five rows, forming a right wing and left wing with a gap in between. Select any cards in the gap between the wings to start your foundation. The object of Chessboard is to build up in sequence and in suit on this card and its 3 matching cards, when they become available. The only playable cards are the end cards on each row, the card on the far right of each row in the right wing, and the card on the far left of each row in the left wing. The end cards can be built on the foundation or can be built on each other up or down in sequence and in suit.
Hint: Select cards for your foundation which are best for manipulation of the tableau.

 

Deuces
Chance of winning 1 in 2 games
All eight twos are displayed, and the object of the game is to build up on each two, in suit and in sequence from two to ace (ace placed after the king).The top card from the deck is in play as is the top card on the wastepile. The deuces are surrounded by cards on three sides, and those can be played on the deuces, too. And just to keep things interesting, while you're building the deuces in suit and in sequence up, you can also build on the surrounding cards in suit and in sequence down. When a space appears surrounding the twos, you can fill it from the deck or the wastepile. When you've played through the deck, you will have one re-deal.

 

Forty Thieves
Chance of winning 1 in 10 games.
Cards are dealt in four to a row,  in ten columns (tableau). Only the bottom cards are playable. Cards can only be moved one at a time. Any time an ace is playable, it is placed above a column. The object of the game is to build up on the aces in sequence and suit to the kings. No redeal is available. For more information click here.

Four Seasons
Chance of winning is 1 in 10 games..
The game starts with five cards in a cross shape, and a fifth card dealt into the left corner space. That card is the one you'll be building on. When you come across the same card as the corner card in a different suit, place it in one of the other three corners and eventually all four corners will be filled. Every game is different; you could be building on any card in the deck, and you'll build up on those four corner cards in sequence and in suit, aces following kings. Turn over one card at a time from the deck, and play it on a corner, or you can build down in sequence on the cards in the cross regardless of suit. Only the top card can be moved. Spaces in the cross can be filled by cards from the deck or the wastepile, but remember the corners can only be filled by the same card as the left corner.
Hold spaces that open-up as valuable. These spaces can be used to start new reverse-order runs, or as temporary storage when you  move cards from one pile to another. Use of these spaces is important for winning.

Frog
Chances of winning is 1 in 5 games.
There are thirteen cards in a face-up pile. Any aces in those 13 are put singly in a row next to the pile of 13 and any aces drawn from the deck are also placed there. These rows are called foundations. The object of the game is to build on each ace in sequence up to kings, regardless of suite.
Turn over one card at a time from the deck; if you can lay it on one of the ace-king sequence piles, do so, if not you must place it in any one of the five wastepiles below the aces. Cards can go on any wastepile, and you can have as many or as few cards in each wastepile as you want. You may also play the top card of the pile of 13 only on a foundation row .
Hints:

Be careful not to  bury a low card below many high cards, you may be stuck.
Reserve a wastepile for kings and queens. !
Avoid placing many cards of the same rank in one wastepile.

Gaps
Chance of winning is 1 in 20 games
There are four rows and thirteen columns of cards, with gaps in each row because the aces have been removed from the deck.
Move the cards around the board by placing a card that is higher and in the same suit as a card to the left of a gap (example; a gap has a seven of spades to it's left; the only card that can be placed in the gap is the eight of spades). No card can be moved into a space to the right of a king.
You can only move twos to the first spot in each row. The object of the game is to move the cards around in the gaps until each row contains an entire sequence of cards, two to king, reading from left to right, one suit on each row.
When the only gaps left are to the right of kings, then you have no more moves and the computer will re-deal, but will only re-deal once. All cards not in proper suit and sequence will be picked up and re-dealt, the twos will automatically be placed at the end of the row (if they're not there already) and each row will again have 13 cards.

 

Golf
Win at Golf, when you have discarded all the cards and have none left, tremendously rare. Expect to leave a few undiscarded cards in nearly every game.  So you play and trying to keep a low average number of left-over cards.
The game begins with five rows, each with seven cards. Only the bottom card of each row is playable. The first card is dealt from the deck to the wastepile. You can build on the card on the wastepile up or down in sequence, irregardless of suit, and the object of the game is to clear all cards out of the five rows and put them all on the wastepile (no need to drag a card to the wastepile; just single click and the card will move for you). Nothing can be placed on a king, and only a two can be placed on an ace. Deal cards from the deck to the wastepile one at a time, and keep trying to eliminate all cards in the five rows. Remember, you can play in sequence up or down, and you'll be changing often. You can only go through the deck once
For more information click here

 

Klondike
The traditional solitaire set of seven piles with one to seven cards in each pile is dealt, with the bottom card the only one turned over and the only one in play. Aces are automatically moved above the seven piles as they appear. The object of the game is to build up on the aces in suit and sequence. The cards in the bottom of the piles are built down on each other alternating colors (red queen on a black king, or red queen on a black jack). When the last remaining card in a pile has been moved, only a king can fill the space; you can move a pile of cards that have been built up together, as long as the bottom card of the pile is a king.

Turn over one card from the deck at a time; play it on an ace or on any of the pile cards or add it to the wastepile. The top card of the wastepile and the top card from the deck are always in play. You go through the deck only once.

 

Monte Carlo
Cards are placed in five rows to form a rectangle, five rows by five columns. The object of the game is to discard all cards to the wastepile (circle in lower left corner) by pair.
You can only discard matching pairs of cards (two jacks, two aces) that are touching each other either horizontally, vertically or diagonally. Once you have discarded all touching pairs, click on the deck and the gaps in the rectangle will be filled in by the remaining cards, with new cards added to the bottom rows to complete the rectangle. Again, discard touching pairs. Continue until either you have no more touching pairs or the deck is played out. When the deck has been played out, click again where the deck used to be and the remaining cards in the rectangle will keep filling in the gaps left behind by discarded cards. As long as you can keep eliminating pairs, keep clicking and the gaps will keep filling in.
If you have two pairs to choose from, try and picture what the rectangle will look like when the gaps are filled in. That's the tricky part.
Hints:

Select the pair that gives more additional plays after consolidation.

 

Pyramid
Twenty eight cards are laid out in a pyramid shape, with each row overlapping the row above it. The top row has one card, the bottom row has seven. The object of the game is to play and discard all pairs of cards that add up to 13; suits do not matter (you can play and discard the eight of diamonds with the five of clubs). Aces count as one, jacks count as eleven, queens count as 12, and kings are an automatic discard since they count as 13.

When you have a king or a pair of cards that equal 13, they are put on the wastepile, in the lower left corner of the screen. You win pyramid if all cards, those in the deck as well as those in the pyramid, end up on the wastepile.
The only playable cards in the pyramid are those that do not have any cards overlapping them.; only the seven cards in the bottom row are playable at the start of the game. Combine the cards in the pyramid with those in the deck, looking for totals of 13. Deck cards are turned up one at a time, and can be played if they combine with one exposed card in the pyramid to total 13. Discard a pair of cards by dragging one card and placing it on top of the other; if they pair add up to 13, the computer will discard them. If there is no pair equaling 13, place the deck card in the discard pile next to the deck, and pick the next card out of the deck. You may also combine the top exposed card on the wastepile with the exposed deck card to make a lucky 13.

For more information click here

 

Solitaire
A set of seven piles with one to seven cards in each pile is dealt, with the bottom card the only one face up and the only one in play. Aces are automatically moved above the seven piles as they appear. The object of the game is to build up on the aces in suit and sequence. The cards on the bottom of the piles are built up or down on each other alternating colors (red queen on a black king, or red queen on a black jack). When the last remaining card in a pile has been moved, only a king can fill the space; you can move a pile of cards that have been built up together, as long as the bottom card of the pile is a king.

Turn over one card from the deck at a time; play it on an ace or on any of the pile cards or add it to the wastepile. The top card of the wastepile and the top card from the deck are always in play. Redeals are allowed.

St. Helena
Four aces are placed in a row, one of each suit. Four kings are placed above them, one of each suit. The rest of the cards are dealt face up in piles surrounding the aces and kings (12 piles in all), The object is to build cards in a complete suit, building up to kings on each of the original four aces, and then down to aces on each of the original four kings, playing the top card from each of the surrounding piles. To expose more cards, you can play the top card on any of the surrounding piles in sequence. By moving them around from one pile to another, you expose more cards and have more possibilities of adding to the original aces and kings (all cards can be moved around to start sequences, but only play a queen on a king and a two on an ace). As if that weren't tricky enough, in the first deal, the four piles above the kings can only be played on the kings, and the four piles below the aces can only be played on the aces (but here's a hint; don't forget to move the cards around from one pile to another). The side piles can be played anywhere.

When you get stuck, you can re-deal, but only twice. In a re-deal, the top left pile is picked up first, and then all other piles are gathered counter clockwise and reshuffled into 12 new piles (depending on how many cards are left). When you re-deal, any cards played out on the original aces and kings are untouched.

Scorpion
Chance of winning is 1 in 10 games
Forty-nine cards are dealt into rows, with the remaining three cards face-down in reserve. The object of the game is to build down on the kings in sequence and in suit. Any face up card can be built down in suit on any other face up card, not just the bottom card, no matter where in the pile it is; even a card buried in a pile can be played and all the cards below it will move with it as a unit. Nothing can be built on an ace.
Hints:

When you get to face-down cards in the rows, turn them over and add them to play. Only a king can fill in the space created by clearing out a whole row.
When you can't play any more cards, add the three reserve cards; they will be dealt to the bottom of the first three rows.
Look at each face-card that covers a face-down card. Trace backwards to see if it can be removed.
When you have a space, trace the series of plays that would follow it create another space
Avoid reversed sequences, these may create blocks

Sly Fox
Chances of winning is 5 out of 6 games.
This two deck game is just as tricky as the name implies.
The game begins with all four aces on the left, all four kings on the right, and twenty cards dealt in between. The object of the game is to build up on the aces in sequence and in suit to the king, and build down on the kings in sequence and in suit to the ace. You may play any card of the twenty cards in the middle, as well as the dealt card and the top card of the wastepile. As you play a card from the middle twenty, immediately fill in the space with a card from the deck.

When you run out of cards to play from the middle twenty, turn over one card at a time from the deck. Either play that card, use it to fill in a space in the middle, or place it on top of any card in the middle twenty. You can place as many or as few cards on top of each other in the middle twenty as you want, and you can put any card on top of any other card. But pay attention! If you bury a card under a lot of cards, you'll never win Sly Fox. Also, once you start dealing you must keep dealing until twenty cards have been added to the middle. Then you can continue to play the middle twenty cards. It's not an easy game to win, but pay attention and you just might out-fox the fox.
Hints:

Do not block yourself from building in suit and sequences.
Scattering of cards is inevitable, if only to avoid blocks.
Earmark one pile for aces and kings which will be wanted last, placing king and ace of same suite together.

Yukon
Chance of wining is 1 in 4 games.
All 52 cards are dealt into seven pyramid piles, 31 of them face up. Aces are moved to the right of the pile, and can be built up in sequence and in suit to kings.

The bottom card of each pile can be added to with the next lower card in numerical sequence but of opposite color (black 8 can be added to red 9). But, unlike regular solitaire, any card that is face up can be moved not just the bottom card. Even if a card is buried in the middle of a pile, it can be moved and all the cards below it will come with it. Turn over face down cards as you they become cleared and add them to play. When you've cleared out a whole row that space can only be filled by a king.
Hints:

Try and expose the face down cards as quickly as possible.
Build on piles only as an aid to manipulating.
Try not to make cards vital for building out of reach.

 

Reference
David, Parlett, 1979, Solitaire: aces up and 399 other card games. Random House Inc, NY, NY.

Walter Gibson, 1964, How to win at solitaire. Doubleday & Company Inc, Garden City, NY.

Morehead, Albert and Geoffrey Mott-Smith, 1949, The complete book of solitaire and patience games. Bantam Books, NY,NY.

Alphonse Moyse, Jr. (1974) 150 ways to play Solitaire. The United States Playing Card Company, Cincinnati, Ohio